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NOTES TO MYSELF HUGH PRATHER EBOOK

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Editorial Reviews. From the Publisher. Reading Notes To Myself is one of those rare edition by Hugh Prather. Religion & Spirituality Kindle eBooks @ Amazon. com. Notes to Myself: My Struggle to Become a Person by [Prather, Hugh]. The editor who discovered the book said, "When I first read Prather's manuscript it Notes to Myself. My Struggle to Become a Person. by Hugh Prather. ebook. Notes to Myself by Hugh Prather; 7 editions; First published in ; DAISY for print-disabled Download ebook for print-disabled (DAISY).


Notes To Myself Hugh Prather Ebook

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Read "Notes to Myself My Struggle to Become a Person" by Hugh Prather available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first. Hugh Prather. DOC | *audiobook | ebooks | Download PDF | ePub. Reading Notes To Myself is one of those rare experiences that comes only once in a great. Reading Notes To Myself is one of those rare experiences that comes The editor who discovered the book said, "When I first read Prather's.

Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Jun 15, Debbie rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Hugh Prather is a huge inspiration and motivation in my life. I have read this book more than 7 times from cover to cover, and I still go back to it everytime i feel a need for the comfort of his words. This book has a particular significance for me. My father passed it to me. His is a edition, which he 'stumbled' upon in a bookstore he can't recall. And his love for this slim book of wisdom finally caught on me when i read it after ending my first relationship.

I had skimmed through it once Hugh Prather is a huge inspiration and motivation in my life. I had skimmed through it once before in my teens but it did nothing for me until I came of a certain understanding and age. I still breathe in the mildew pages and somewhat dog-eared corners, with penciled notes on my thoughts and their respective dates which I penned them in the sides.

I guess I would call this my 'family heirloom'. Indeed, 'on becoming a person' the book which inspired Prather initially, has worked its miracle in my life!

Hugh Prather

A please-you-have-to-read-it book. View 1 comment. Since they're both attempts to make sense of life and personal responsibility in diary form, this reminded me of one of my favourite books of last year, Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. I'll state a few differences: Notes to Myself manages to maintain a deeply personal feel but is far more accessible, clearly having been written with a wider audience in mind. His thought process seemed like a continual, churning struggle against certain desires and habits in order to shape himself into an ideal.

Notes to Myself is influenced by Stoicism as Aurelius was, but takes a more modern, mindful approach, with a greater emphasis on overcoming problems through acceptance. Aurelius was a Roman Emperor during the height of its power, while Hugh Prather is in every sense an 'ordinary person'.

On the one hand, this means Aurelius' writing is vaster in scope and deals with a wider array of issues and responsibilities, and as an account of that kind there's nothing else like it, but on the other, Prather's is more relatable in the modern day on average.

He was taught by some of the greatest tutors of his time, as you would expect from the adopted son of the Emperor. Hugh Prather seems largely to be exploring these ideas by himself, and as such is occasionally rather naive, but that does little to devalue the rest.

Aurelius lent on ideas that had a fairly strong philosophical basis, whereas Prather's thoughts are occasionally treated as self-evident, though there is value in some of these, as they were relatable or able to be reasoned out. Both are the sort of book where you get out of them what you put in. Much of what either of them say can be said to be obvious, but at their best, both express even the most obvious ideas very well, and serve as an excellent reminder, since the obvious isn't always readily available in a bind.

I intend to consult both in the future. View 2 comments. Jan 16, Parthiban Sekar rated it really liked it Shelves: One man's struggle to look into moral obligations, societal dilemmas, temptations and fears all of us face and how to overcome all these are presented in the form of axioms by the man himself - Hugh Prather.

Though I am not much of a fan of Self-Help books, this one got me glued and I read it for days in bits and pieces.

The subtle presentation with great nicety of this man's inquiry into his doings, thoughts and feelings are not just about himself but about all of us, the whole human race.

MUS One man's struggle to look into moral obligations, societal dilemmas, temptations and fears all of us face and how to overcome all these are presented in the form of axioms by the man himself - Hugh Prather. Jul 12, Chayne rated it it was amazing.

An old friend let me borrow this book before. I've only read it once, never read it since, but have still kept what i've learned from this book close to my heart.

It's a collection of little sayings, ideas, or "notes" if you would, from the author. It's his notes to himself basically.

It comes from such a raw, uncut perspective, that it's a work of art in it's own right.

I wrote down a bunch of my favorite notes and refer to them from time to time for consolation. Some favorites include, "My tro An old friend let me borrow this book before.

Some favorites include, "My trouble is I analyze life instead of live it.

Feb 09, Anjali Jain rated it it was amazing. Notes to myself is one of those books which should be definitely read by everyone. Now by saying this I definitely don't mean everyone will like it but I feel the only reason for not liking it can be the lack of understanding it.

That's purely my judgement of the book This isnt one such book which we pick up and read to have a good time and then maybe add one more book to our "Read" list but this book makes you think and see things more deeply and atleast give some insight into life, people and m Notes to myself is one of those books which should be definitely read by everyone. That's purely my judgement of the book This isnt one such book which we pick up and read to have a good time and then maybe add one more book to our "Read" list but this book makes you think and see things more deeply and atleast give some insight into life, people and more importantly ourselves.

While reading this book I have come across various lines which gave me the feeling that "yes, I would write the same thing,yes even I feel this way" probably thats what the idea is This one is a keeper and maybe someday when I read it again or someone I know reads it I will have someone to discuss this book and understand it better Jan 23, Robert Beveridge rated it it was ok Shelves: This was an ugly experience.

The worst part is, it didn't HAVE to be an ugly experience. Yet more evidence that, yes, it's all in the presentation. Notes to Myself is a collection of observations and thoughts from Prather's journals. They range from the surprisingly insightful "The principle seems to be: And had they been presented as prose journal entries in other words, as they were no doubt written , this could have been a small surprise, a bit of a self-help book that doesn't try to batter the reader over the head with stupid jargon.

Instead, however, it is presented as poetry, and in this presentation it becomes a marvel of offense. You know how magazine editors are constantly decrying submissions that are "prose chopped up into short lines?

It's literally prose chopped up into short lines. If Prather's journal actually contains this stuff in poetic form, that makes it even more monstrous.

The material in here, while workable prose, violates every possible rule of poetry one can conceive. No thought at all went into the line breaks, the word choice, the image what very little here is presented as image in the first place! It's obvious thought and reflection went into the material, but one of the main differences between poetry and prose is that the presentation of the material is far more important in poetry than it is in prose.

In fact, the presentation is more important than the material itself, something Prather or his editor, blame whichever you like obviously didn't grasp. Dec 06, Briana rated it it was amazing. Read it. Keep it on your desk, by your bed, on your coffee table, in your bag.

So much wisdom and inspiration in this book. I am so glad I found it. Mar 24, Gretchen rated it it was ok Shelves: When I picked up this book, I was expecting revelations that would make me think, challenge my preconceived notions about life, and become one of my favorites. The book has no page numbers, so I don't know exactly where I stopped reading, but I'm about halfway through.

I can't read any more of this drivel. I had heard such great things about Hugh Prather and I'm sure some people find this kind of thing enlightening, but it's simply boring.

Perhaps I'm more self-aware than some, but I have had ma When I picked up this book, I was expecting revelations that would make me think, challenge my preconceived notions about life, and become one of my favorites.

Perhaps I'm more self-aware than some, but I have had many of the same "revelations" years ago. This is an example of the trite drivel contained in this book. If I have to ask myself if I'm hungry, I'm not. It's like the author just jotted down every single lame thought and emotion that entered his head throughout the day and made them into a book.

I'm not sure why this was even published. I gave it two stars instead of one just for the effort it must have taken to note all of these daily thoughts. He should have kept them to himself. Apr 16, Ina Aditi Solanki rated it it was amazing Shelves: I know that I'll always keep coming back to it for Hugh Prather's words are like a source of inspiration and comfort to me.

This is the kind of book you don't hope to finish in one go but read in bits and pieces letting the words slowly sink their meaning in and consequently learning how a simple act of writing small notes to oneself can be so freeing and healing.

Feb 05, Brian rated it it was amazing Shelves: Every so often, I manage to pick up a particular book at a time in my life right when I need to read it; Notes to Myself is one of those books. I am sure I will be reading this over and over and over again at different stages of my life, but it was absolutely a perfect read for what I needed right now.

Oct 26, Cassie Journeay rated it it was amazing Shelves: A lovely read for food for thought. Nothing to take at face value alone, but very nice for new perspective and self awareness on things I would like to work on about myself. Will pick up again when I need a reality check, and to see if the things I have underlined have changed from idea to reality.

Oct 29, Sarah rated it really liked it Recommended to Sarah by: This wasn't nearly as hippie dippy as I had expected.

Though it is definitely self-help, I wasn't put off by it the way I am by a lot of pop psychobabble. Prather offers plenty of good food for thought and some surprising insights.

I'm certain I'll pick this one up again.

View all 3 comments. Aug 24, Levi rated it liked it. A collection of one man's thoughts through life. Some of it is really insightful, others are mediocre. The nice part is there are no page numbers and no chapters; so it is easy to pick up and put down. Katherine L.

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Lyrics of a Dreamer's Heart. Fionna M. Delecia A. Give Ease a Chance. Angelika Ruppert. Notes to Myself. Hugh Prather.

Standing On My Head: Life Lessons In Contradictions. The Little Book of Letting Go. I Will Never Leave You. Morning Notes: Spiritual Notes To Myself: Essential Wisdom For The 21st Century. Shining Through: How to write a great review. The review must be at least 50 characters long. The title should be at least 4 characters long. Your display name should be at least 2 characters long. At Kobo, we try to ensure that published reviews do not contain rude or profane language, spoilers, or any of our reviewer's personal information.

Like Notes to Myself, this is a collection of brief musings, some lovely, others humorous. Despite the overall wisdom of Prather's message, a few of the musings reveal what seems to be an underlying anger and impatience toward people struggling with such problems as codependency, addiction and divorce.

Perhaps if Prather had fleshed out his thoughts in longer sections of prose, his points would have been made in a more complete and understandable way. It is not helpful to simply proclaim that "love does not participate in madness," without explaining how one might identify madness, or to instruct readers to "Forget this doormat stuff," ridiculing the terms "enabler" and "codependent," or to announce that healing one's inner child and nurturing one's own child can't be done at once.

These are complex issues deserving of more compassion and respect than Prather provides, particularly as he preaches universal love.

Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc. His latest reflections turn away from the theme of self-fulfillment to the awareness that love and service are the way to heal our separation from God and one another. The Methodist minister touches briefly on issues such as gossip, money, marriage, parenting, prayer, and dying with thoughtfulness and humorous practicality.

Sure to please many readers with its timeless wisdom presented in a fresh, simple manner. See all Editorial Reviews.

Product details File Size: Conari Press January 1, Publication Date: January 1, Sold by: English ASIN: Enabled X-Ray: Not Enabled. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Showing of 15 reviews. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Paperback Verified Purchase. Haven't yet been able to make time to read this but I very much enjoy Hugh Prather and have his original book so I'm looking forward to reading this sooner than later.

I took a leap to give this 5 stars before I've read just based on a quick glance and history of other books by Hugh Prather and hopefully will remain at this quality level. One person found this helpful. Hardcover Verified Purchase. One of my all time favorite books.

It is my nightstand book. I read it over and over I have purchased several copies and have given them as gifts. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. A gentle reminder of the value of each and every human life, and the beauty of that humanness.

We are wired to search for meaning around us and in this book Prather helps us see that it is the search itself that brings the meaning. A good friend gave me a copy of the original "Spiritual Notes" which gave me a lot of insight for and to myself. This is an excellent followup for anyone looking for an answer to the "why is this happening? Have bought this book more than once in past for gifts.Nancy Burke. Eric Butterworth. Danielle LaPorte. Timothy Ferriss. Friend Reviews.

Apr 15, Daniel Barenboim rated it it was ok. Aluney Elferr. There's so many pages in this book that I can't wait to accidentally use when I random pick it up and turn to a page. Lebogang Sewela. The book has no page numbers, so I don't know exactly where I stopped reading, but I'm about halfway through.

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