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THE HINDI BINDI CLUB EBOOK

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Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. The age-old intergenerational struggle between Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Literature & Fiction. The Hindi-Bindi Club by Monica Pradhan. Read an Buy the Ebook: Kobo · Barnes & Noble People Who Read The Hindi-Bindi Club Also Read. ‹ › The Door. PDF | Societal depictions of mother-daughter relationships owe much to mentioned in the novel “The Hindi Bindi Club by Monica Pradhan”.


The Hindi Bindi Club Ebook

Author:CECILE MCGUINNESS
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Genre:Fiction & Literature
Pages:422
Published (Last):22.04.2016
ISBN:191-2-68542-656-5
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They are the Hindi-Bindi Club, a nickname given by their American daughters to the mothers who left India to start life anew. Daughters, now grown, and facing. Achetez et téléchargez ebook The Hindi-Bindi Club: A Novel (English Edition): Boutique Kindle - Family Saga: ecogenenergy.info The Hindi-Bindi Club. Monica Pradhan ecogenenergy.info ISBN: | pages | 23 Mb Download The Hindi-Bindi Club The Hindi- Bindi.

So, one day in Costco, when I saw this book among the other stacks I added it to my cart hoping to learn a little and be entertained. Well, I know there is so much I don't know, but I feel like I got to look through a key hole to a beautifu I am very fascinated by Bollywood movies, but do not know a whole lot about Indian culture.

Well, I know there is so much I don't know, but I feel like I got to look through a key hole to a beautiful and fascinating culture.

This novel was very entertaining and a lot of fun. The characters were complex and realistic. The plot was engaging. I would love to try the recipes, but am terrified due to the complexity and my complete lack of knowledge when it comes to Indian cuisine. My only complaint was the end. It felt rushed. I think she could have taken more time. She had all these interesting plots that had been built up and they just seemed to end in a perfect little bow.

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I am not complaining as much about the perfect bow though as I am about how quickly she tied it. It felt like she just wanted to get it finished and no longer spend the time with the characters. But, I still enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone. Oh, and if you have any aversion to "chick lit" you might want to pick up another book. It is sappy and sugary, but it won't cause any cavities and does have some definite meat to it.

A generous three stars because the author struck me as intelligent and genuine. She even included a bibliography!

Even the recipes included at the end of each chapter didnt annoy me. I found them a sweet addition. Although not a new approach, and very risky since if done the wrong way could really become trite.

The Hindi-bindi Club by Monica Pradhan

But in this book, it was appropriate since Indian culture is very much about food. And they were Americanized enough for me to think 'hey, we like curry, maybe I will try that! Note to author: If you do not think your readers politically aware enough or informationally savvy enough to know who Benazir Bhutto is, then don't mention her.

Or you can explain breifly who she is in a footnote. But it is highly insulting to readers who DO know who she is to be told about her in a precursory dismissive way.

Bottom Line: I skimmed the end of the book. Sep 24, Yuki rated it liked it Shelves: I hate you Goodreads. Monica Pradhan - decent writer. Story - told in the first person by three American-born-Indian daughters and their immigrant mothers.

Problem - trying to tell the narratives of SIX women , while also exposing the reader to Indian culture, customs, food, dress, language, history esp Partition , mythology, religion, etc. Technical information overload, at times akin to reading a text book. Result - Too much information crammed into not enough pages, taking up space where the narratives should have been.

The individual stories started off strong but in the end some of the women's tales were somewhat lacking. For example, you find out one of the mothers is having an affair with her first love - and that's it. Like, hello? What annoyed me - The realism of it all that was sarcasm, btw. ALL the daughters are professionally "uber successful" one's a doctor, one's a rocket scientist-turned-successful-artist , one's a corporate something-or-other.

Two of the girls have "great marriages", one of the two also has "great kids". Side note: Of course there has to be SOME issue which is provided by Kiran one of the daughters , who has gotten divorced and decides she MUST meet a man, get married and have a family ASAP because she is 32 years old - therefore she's willing to settle for an 'arranged marriage' with an Indian man as in looking for compatibility of life goals, not true love.

And while the book is pages long, this all happens in the LAST 87!!! Not only that, you don't get to READ about the falling-in-love process but you're 'told' via phone call when Kiran tells her mother. And of course this culminates into the "perfect wedding" at the end of the book along with all the other characters wrapping up their stories and their individual issues "happily ever after".

Do you see the problem I had with all this? I like books and storylines to be consistent. When you read Like Water for Chocolate you know from the first page it's going to be a whimsical fairytale-like story.

When you read Bridges of Madison County the gentle theme, pace and tone carries throughout - even as the two characters fall in love over a matter of days. The Hindi-Bindi Club is set up under the umbrella of REALISM putting aside the fact that none of the daughters had regular office cubicle jobs or marriage problems or "oops babies" etc.

It's realistic - from the first generation immigrant experience to the second generation experience of straddling two cultures to the stories of the grandparents in the old country.

It's chock-full of 'real stuff' - historical, cultural, etc. But then I don't know what the author was thinking although at the back of the book there is a 'Letter To the Reader' in which she admits she wanted to keep working on the novel. The reason this book got three stars - because like I said before, Monica Pradhan is a decent writer. And she had some really great things to say about life and living mostly voicing it from the mother's perspective.

If you read this overlooking the gag-me-with-a-spoon, eye-rolling, bullshxt ending , I think you would enjoy it too.

View all 3 comments. Sep 22, Annie rated it it was amazing. The writing was stellar, the story was awesome. I found the characters super relatable and the ending was adorable.

If you loved joy luck club, you would love this -- and love the "desi" or Indian additions. Apr 18, Elena rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a book that jumped out at me at a used book store but for whatever reason, I didn't buy it.

A few months later I came back looking for it because I couldn't stop thinking "why didn't I buy that book? I finally read it while I was sick and looking for some relief from academic research for a class and it was great. The story is told from the alternating viewpoints of three first generation Indian-Amer This is a book that jumped out at me at a used book store but for whatever reason, I didn't buy it.

The story is told from the alternating viewpoints of three first generation Indian-American girls and their mothers. The alternating viewpoints threw me at first but after a few chapters you become more interested in the stories and can easily keep up.

The three daughters have grown up in a kind of forced friendship more like cousins derived from their mothers' friendships. Though all three families hail from different parts of India, their parents found common ground as Indian immigrants and remained close over a period of years--gathering frequently in what their daughters dubbed "The Hindi Bindi Club"--the sole place where they find comfort and understanding and support each other through an immigrant's struggle's.

The Hindi Bindi Club is also the only place where they can freely enjoy their Indian heritage and speak Hindu. If you liked that as I did , you will enjoy this book. It's a light read--entertaining, sometimes sad, sometimes funny--but over all worth your time. Sep 20, Judy rated it it was ok Recommends it for: No one. The only reason this book got two stars instead of one was the presence of recipes. It's about three Indian families who moved to the US, and focuses on the mothers and their American-born daughters.

Let's start with the title: Not to mention how derivative it is of "The Joy Luck Club. They seemed to be mouthpieces for information about Indian culture and politics. The writing was lazy. This is probably the worst instance: It's made me more philosophical. Less judgmental. Jun 28, Laura rated it liked it. It's easy to read, and it's not complicated by any real emotional exploration by any of the characters.

The plot is predictable, and the conversations between the characters are superficial.

However, I enjoyed it. It's a great break from whatever serious stuff you've been reading. The latter is rather insulting to Laura Esquivel. Yes, the Hindi-Bindi Club has recipes, and they look excellent.

However, the recipes are not integrated into the story in the same way that they propel the story forward in "Like Water for Chocolate.

Sep 01, Marissa rated it it was ok Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

Story had potential but in the end fell flat. Some of the prose was gagging--for example, the emails between Kiran and Preity at the end regarding her wedding. They were supposed enemeis as kids but now all of a sudden best buds, because Preity tells Kiran she had an eating disorder so was far from perfect.

Just really disappointed. Another silly plot--Preity looks for and finds the boy "that got away" on a semester-break trip to India, only to send him some cryptic letter that the reader doesn' Story had potential but in the end fell flat.

Another silly plot--Preity looks for and finds the boy "that got away" on a semester-break trip to India, only to send him some cryptic letter that the reader doesn't even find out whether he understood.

Also, every single daughter marrying a non-Indian? That was a little far-fetched for me. Disappointment all the way. Oct 04, Kate rated it liked it. I loved that this book dwelled on the Indian heritage, and the recipes included are certainly ones that I want to try. The prose and dialogue felt forced though. The book cover insinuates that it's on par with "The Joy Luck Club. Mar 07, Sheila rated it it was ok. Chick lit Asian Style. I didn't care for this book - many of the emails did not ring true to character and the story was confusing at times.

The Asian history was the best part of the book. The recipes looked interesting but, to be honest, I didn't read it for the recipes. My book club read this book, 2 girls didn't finish it and the rest of the consensus was lukewarm. Apr 21, Celina rated it it was amazing. Pleasant, fun, read full of great quotes like this one: Irish Diplomacy is the ability to tell a man to go to hell so that he looks forward to making the trip. Aug 22, Mirte rated it liked it. Whilst masquerading as a breezy novel on a group of Indian women and their feelings on food, marriage and children, this novel gives an interesting insight in the clashes between east and west, the challenges of being both American and Indian, of uniting the two, and of different generations with differing ideas concerning how to do this.

I liked this novel more than I thought I would, really, as it dove into Indian history, using personal experiences to tell stories on the Partition, religious c Whilst masquerading as a breezy novel on a group of Indian women and their feelings on food, marriage and children, this novel gives an interesting insight in the clashes between east and west, the challenges of being both American and Indian, of uniting the two, and of different generations with differing ideas concerning how to do this.

I liked this novel more than I thought I would, really, as it dove into Indian history, using personal experiences to tell stories on the Partition, religious conflicts and immigration. I especially empathised with the three younger women, feeling sometimes that the portrayal and voices of the older generation were less distinct from one another.

Monica Pradhan

Incidentally, it felt a little too much like a puzzle in terms of time line, as if important bits were skipped over too lightly. It might also have been interesting to get different views on the same scene, which barely happened, but would have been enlightening for sure.

The recipes that come interspersed with the narrative give the novel an even more authentic feel and are very inviting, urging me to try some of them at home after the luscious descriptions by the characters! Sep 01, Kiran rated it really liked it. So I must confess that I'm rather biased in my opinion of this book.

With a name like Kiran, you don't see that much in American literature! All-in-all from the cultural "I get it" moments, to the delightful recipes and Indian cooking tips at the ends of each chapter, this book just spoke to me. I also found the part on Partition fasci So I must confess that I'm rather biased in my opinion of this book. I also found the part on Partition fascinating, as this is something I know very little about and had never heard about from my father; it made me want to read more about the Partition and I'm grateful for the bibliography at the end unusual for a novel so that I can learn more about this major event and the stories that surrounded it.

Such an unsuccessful first attempt Consequently I feel a lot of the movies I have watched have not been enjoyed as much as they could have due to my lack of eduction in this part of the world's history. So, one day in Costco, when I saw this book among the other stacks I added it to my cart hoping to learn a little and be entertained.

Well, I know there is so much I don't know, but I feel like I got to look through a key hole to a beautifu I am very fascinated by Bollywood movies, but do not know a whole lot about Indian culture. Well, I know there is so much I don't know, but I feel like I got to look through a key hole to a beautiful and fascinating culture.

This novel was very entertaining and a lot of fun. The characters were complex and realistic. The plot was engaging. I would love to try the recipes, but am terrified due to the complexity and my complete lack of knowledge when it comes to Indian cuisine.

My only complaint was the end.

Literary Fiction Category: Literary Fiction. Paperback —.

Buy the Ebook: Add to Cart. About The Hindi-Bindi Club For decades they have remained close, sharing treasured recipes, honored customs, and the challenges of women shaped by ancient ways yet living modern lives.

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